IMG_0325Our new, closest neighbours are birds. All kinds of birds. IMG_7030
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Out front, sea birds: seagulls, Canada geese, ducks, a lone heron, a bald eagle, and turkey vultures. Out back, the land birds: owls, crows, Stellar’s jays, robins, woodpeckers, hummingbirds, fat little brown ground feeders, quails, and more of which I cannot identify.
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And so this year, I decided a bird feeder was in order. Sounds simple, right? I thought so too.
Aside from an ill-fated experiment with a hummingbird feeder, I’ve never had one before. Off I go to Canadian Tire to pick one up, and here’s the first problem: there are lots, and lots of bird feeders. Everything from tables for two, to deluxe condo style towers that can feed a crowd. There’s kinds for nectar, and seed, and suet. Okay, I think, I’ll get the biggest one, we have a lot of birds, and this community table will be nice. But then I see one labelled “woodpeckers” and I get that one too, because they have a different diet, apparently. And then another, little one that I think would be good for those newlyweds looking for an intimate dinner.
Okey dokey, as I stare at the cart, that’s great, I have the feeders, now what to put in them?
At first glance, I only need two things: suet plugs, and bird seed. Suet plugs, no problem. Bird seed–there’s about a gazillion different kinds. What would be on the menu? Sunflower seeds? Dried fruit mix? Nut blend? Premium? Songbird? Winter mix? Peanuts? Peanuts! I have a squirrel hanging around too, have to keep him happy and out of the feeders. Finally settling on a bag that had happy-looking birds on the front, I head home.
Then it hits me: community table, intimate dinners for two, dietary restrictions, special menus, menu theme–feeding birds is just like opening a restaurant.
At least it’s a self-serve.

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